News

Tribal College Journal holds student writing, cover art competitions

The Tribal College Journal (TCJ) is holding its annual student writing and cover art contest. The top three entries in each of the three writing categories, as well as the cover artist, will be awarded prizes and published in the TCJ Student Edition, which is distributed to 18,000 readers.

“Getting work published is not only an honor, it’s also great for resumes and portfolios,” said Ryan Wynne, NWIC public information officer. “I hope our talented students here at NWIC will participate.”

NWIC Port Gamble science lab to open with a celebration

The new lab opens doors to students at the site pursuing science degrees

Northwest Indian College Biology 101 students Sandra Horton, left, and Madison Sullivan in the new laboratory at NWIC’s Port Gamble S’Klallam site. They are studying relationships of form and function in various Northwest fishes, including the Pacific Mackerel.
Northwest Indian College Biology 101 students Sandra Horton, left, and Madison Sullivan in the new laboratory at NWIC’s Port Gamble S’Klallam site. They are studying relationships of form and function in various Northwest fishes, including the Pacific Mackerel.

A grand opening celebration for the new Northwest Indian College (NWIC) Port Gamble S’Klallam science laboratory classroom will be held from 10 a.m. until noon on Dec. 6. The lab is located in the Tribe’s House of Knowledge and Education Center.

The event is free and open to the public, and will include an opening ceremony and blessing of the lab by Gene Jones, a S’Klallam elder, followed by an interactive sharing of biology lab student projects and complimentary coffee and pastries.

The new lab, which is outfitted with $30,000 worth of furniture and equipment, opens doors to students at the site interested in science classes that require lab work.

Native arts and crafts fair features handmade gifts

This year’s Northwest Indian College Native Arts & Crafts Fair will feature everything from traditional to contemporary art from local Native artists.

The open, community event will take place from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m. Dec. 2 and from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. Dec. 3 in the Cultural Arts Center on the Northwest Indian College (NWIC) campus at 2522 Kwina Road. The Cultural Arts Center will be available for vendor set up beginning at 2 p.m. 

“The holiday season is right around the corner, and this arts and crafts fair is a great way to find individual, unique, diverse, and locally-produced gifts,” said Victoria Retasket, NWIC student activities and leadership coordinator. “Every artist hand crafts each item piece by piece, and the pieces are all made with love, and often a story.”

Today: Lummi PhD to share her story and work for Indian Country

Lummi tribal member Dr. Rose James, a University of Washington professor and member of the Native Research Network, will speak today, Nov. 16, at noon in the Cultural Arts Building – Building 7. A build-your-own sandwich lunch will be provided.

James, who received her PhD in pathology in 2002 from UW, is now Acting Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioethics and Humanities for the university.

New NWIC building will open with community celebration

A grand opening celebration for the new Northwest Indian College (NWIC) Cooperative Extension Building will be held from 10:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. Dec. 2.

The event, which is free and open to the community, will include a prayer and blessing of the building, a ribbon cutting, a meal consisting of traditional foods and a guest speaker (to be announced) who will talk about the importance of food sovereignty and of the Cooperative Extension department’s work to tribal peoples.

NWIC adds Nursing Assistant Certification program

Northwest Indian College (NWIC) is now offering a Nursing Assistant Certification program to help students gain employment in a high-demand industry. Classes for the program began Oct. 31.

“During this economic downturn, the health professions sector still saw a significant increase in job openings, as opposed to losing jobs,” Fran Dodson, NWIC director of workforce education said.

Navajo code talkers: WWII’s unsung heroes

On Oct. 27, Northwest Indian College (NWIC) students, faculty, staff and community members gathered in the Log Building to hear the stories of Samuel Tso, a World War II Navajo code talker.

Code talkers were recruited by the U.S. military early in the war as a solution to Japanese intelligence. That country’s intelligence was breaking all but the most complex of codes – and the complex codes were taking U.S. soldiers too long to decipher.

What would you do to save your culture?

On Wednesday, Oct. 26, guest speaker Geshe Yonten will discuss the loss of culture as a result of globalization and conflict.

Yonten, a Tibetan monk from Zanskar, India, will center his discussion on the necessity of preserving the Zanskar region and Tibetan culture. He will highlight unique values of Tibetan culture and the impact of losing them.

NWIC Halloween dance and costume contest set for Friday

Get spooky and dance your masks off at this year’s Northwest Indian College (NWIC) Halloween Dance.

From right - Nicole, Crystal, LC, and un-named.
From right - Nicole, Crystal, LC, and un-named.

The dance will take place from 9 p.m. to 12 a.m. Friday, Oct. 28 in the Cultural Arts Building. DJ Big Rez will shake the walls and refreshments will be available.

NWIC Saturday Science Academy heads to the beach this weekend

On Saturday, Oct. 22, the Northwest Indian College Saturday Science Academy invites high school students to explore the intertidal marine zone habitat and help improve beach health through cleanup with the Lummi Natural Resources Department.

Students will also tour the Marine Life Center in Bellingham to see live marine wildlife such as sea stars, sea urchins, octopus, crab and shellfish.